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Why Memorizing Lyrics is Good For Your Brain
Wellness

Why Memorizing Lyrics is Good For Your Brain

When was the last time you memorized something little long? May be when you were in school or college! Once out of school most of you forget to memorize and according to many studies that could be the reason for bad memory recall among adults.

If memorizing without understanding the meaning is bad for children, not memorizing anything at all for years is bad for adults. May be that is the reason most of you out there are having poor memory recall.

To help your brain improve memory, it is important to memorize few lines every now and then. Simplest way to do that is memorizing lyrics of some song that you like. When you choose to learn a song, you apparently increase the level of acetylcholine in your brain, a chemical that helps improve memory. Music anyway has a way of relaxing your muscles. Learning and singing it loud can help you bring down your stress levels.

(Also read: Improve Your Memory By Focusing On What You Want To Remember For 10 Seconds)

Researchers from the National Institute on Health and Aging, the U.S found that adults who went through memory training were better able to maintain higher cognitive functioning and everyday skills, even five years after going through the training. It was also found that students who start practicing memory training now can stay sharp for years to come.

A 2013 study in the Journal of Positive Psychology found that people who listened to upbeat music improve their moods and boost their happiness in just two weeks. According to a book, Train Your Mind, Change Your Brain by Sharon Begley, the structure and function of the adult brain is not set in stone as scientists have always said. The book says that when you make a new habit, the connections in your brain change. Your brain's ability to concentrate effectively can be changed for the better with time.

(Image Credit: Thinkstock)

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