Eating Broccoli Thrice A Week Lowers Liver Cancer RiskHealth

Eating Broccoli Thrice A Week Lowers Liver Cancer Risk

IANS
Consuming broccoli three to five times per week may lower the risk of liver cancer and also prevent the development of fatty liver, finds a new study.

According to researchers, including broccoli in the diet may protect against liver cancer and aid in countering the development of fatty liver or nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) which can cause liver malfunctioning and lead to liver cancer with a high mortality rate.

"The normal story about broccoli and health is that it can protect against a number of different cancers. But nobody had looked at liver cancer," said Elizabeth Jeffery from the University of Illinois, US.

"We decided that liver cancer needed to be studied particularly because of the obesity epidemic in the US. It is already in the literature that obesity enhances the risk for liver cancer and this is particularly true for men," Jeffery added.

Previous research suggests that broccoli, a brassica vegetable containing bioactive compounds, may impede the accumulation of fat in the liver and protect against NAFLD in mice.

Researchers wanted to find out the impact of feeding broccoli to mice with a known liver cancer-causing carcinogen.

They studied four groups of mice, some of which were on a control diet or the Westernised diet and some were given or not given broccoli.

"We called this a Westernised-style diet in the study because we wanted to model how so many of us are eating today," Jeffery says.

The findings showed that in mice on the Westernised diet both the number of cancer nodules and the size of the cancer nodules increased in the liver.

But when broccoli was added to the diet, the number of nodules decreased, but the size was not affected.

The researchers found that the Westernised diet did increase fatty liver, but the broccoli protected against it.

Broccoli stopped too much uptake of fat into the liver by decreasing the uptake and increasing the output of lipid from the liver.

Adding broccoli to the diet of the mice did not make them "thin" or affect their body weight, but it did bring the liver under control, ultimately making them healthier, Jeffery noted.
(Image: Flickr)

Contribute to LifeHacker

Write for Us

Comments ()

X
Sort By:
Be the first one to review.

Suggested for you

  • Access Facebook messages from your phone without installing the Messenger app

    Access Facebook messages from your phone without installing the Messenger app
  • Take Control of Unwanted Emails with This Simple Trick

    Take Control of Unwanted Emails with This Simple Trick
  • 20 Minutes of Moderate Exercise is Enough to Stay Healthy

    20 Minutes of Moderate Exercise is Enough to Stay Healthy
  • Google Pixel is now on Snapdeal with cashback and protection plans

    Google Pixel is now on Snapdeal with cashback and protection plans
  • Charm a Person You Just Met by Addressing Him by His Name

    Charm a Person You Just Met by Addressing Him by His Name
  • Find a lost object in less than 2 minutes by mentally retracing your steps

    Find a lost object in less than 2 minutes by mentally retracing your steps
  • Get the Edge Functionality Of Samsung Galaxy S7 Edge on Any Android phone with this app

    Get the Edge Functionality Of Samsung Galaxy S7 Edge on Any Android phone with this app
  • Government Launches an App that Provides Detailed Information About SEZs

    Government Launches an App that Provides Detailed Information About SEZs
  • SC Asks Center the Possibility of Regulating WhatsApp

    SC Asks Center the Possibility of Regulating WhatsApp
  • New image analysis technique can diagnose diseases using cell phone images

    New image analysis technique can diagnose diseases using cell phone images
  • WhatsApp denies encrypted messages can be accessed

    WhatsApp denies encrypted messages can be accessed
  • Microsoft to bring new 'Game Mode' to Windows

    Microsoft to bring new 'Game Mode' to Windows
  • Google is Bringing Machine Learning To Compress High-Resolution Photos To Save Data Usage

    Google is Bringing Machine Learning To Compress High-Resolution Photos To Save Data Usage

Editor's Pick

  • Unlock Your iOS 10 Devices without Touch ID or Home Button

    Unlock Your iOS 10 Devices without Touch ID or Home Button
  • ​ 5 Qualities Most Interesting People in the World Have in Common

    ​ 5 Qualities Most Interesting People in the World Have in Common
  • 'Fitbit for Alcohol' Will Tell You When You Have Had Enough Drinks

    'Fitbit for Alcohol' Will Tell You When You Have Had Enough Drinks

Subscribe to latest stories

Trending on social



Subscribe for latest stories