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Save Money by Collecting Accomplishments Instead of ItemsSaving Money

Save Money by Collecting Accomplishments Instead of Items

Shep McAllister , Gawker Media

Save Money by Collecting Accomplishments Instead of Items

There's nothing wrong with being a collector, but if the items you collect can be consumed , like books, movies, or games, you can save space and money by tracking the things you've completed, rather than filling your home with a physical collection.

Take books, for example. Book collectors might fill up their shelves before they've had time to read everything they bought. Not only are these unread books a waste of money and space, they can also be a source of nagging stress until you finish them. Trent at The Simple Dollar broke this cycle by ""collecting"" a list of books he's read, rather than stockpiling a small library at home:

Rather than collecting books, I've moved on to trying to build a collection of "books I've read." I'm keeping a careful list and I get that same proud rush when I can add a book to that list of reads. I'm no longer worried about buying books at all - I'm perfectly happy to get them at the library or to download classics.

Rather than collecting games, I'm more interested in a list of games I've played or electronic games I've "beaten" (or played to some satisfactory level of completion). I now prefer to stick with games until I've thoroughly played them or else trade them with friends. I also love going to community board game nights.

Obviously, this won't work for every type of collection, but it's a great idea for media collections. There are even apps dedicated to these lists like Done Not Done . Admittedly, you can't fill a bookshelf with a list of things you've read or watched, but you can always revisit it with pride, all while saving money and space.

Collect Accomplishments, Not Stuff | The Simple Dollar

Photo by juliasphotos (Shutterstock) .

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