Please Try again!
Stuck in the FoMO cycle? Practice MindfulnessLife

Stuck in the FoMO cycle? Practice Mindfulness

S. Shanthi
The word FoMO (Fear Of Missing Out) has become so common over the years that it was even added to the Oxford English Dictionary in 2013. A recent study defined FoMO as "the uneasy and sometimes all-consuming feeling that you're missing out - that your peers are doing, in the know about, or in possession of more or something better than you''. Nearly three fourth of young adults said they have experienced this never ending cycle.

The best trick to deal with it is practicing mindfulness. By mindfulness we mean an awareness that helps you enjoy the present moment. Enjoy every moment rather than multitasking or hurrying up one task to get on to the next one. When you appreciate your current state of being, you will never have the fear of missing out. You should not constantly yearn for what is not in your control.
Dan Herman who first identified and named FoMO says that FoMO is a result of everybody being constantly connected via mobile devices and social media. "We are available to communicate in every possible way so as not to be left out from anything and not to miss on any opportunity that might arise," he says.

(Also read: Trust Your Gut When It Senses Something Going Wrong )

The trick is to learn to practice discernment. You should distinguish what is important from what is just an element of desire. Once you do that, try to chuck certain things that don't contribute much to the quality of life. Findings of a recent study shows that those with low levels of satisfaction of the fundamental needs for competence, autonomy, and relatedness tend towards higher levels of fear of missing out as do those with lower levels of general mood and overall life satisfaction. So, stop comparing yourself to others and love yourself for who you are. We all have our own idiosyncrasies.

That's what makes life interesting. The more you compare yourself with others, the more you will attract unhappiness. While there is nothing blatantly wrong in desiring something, you shouldn't miss out on the small joys of everyday life. You should embrace life's small pleasures, rather than holding out for big ones. Even the smallest pleasures can raise your happiness quotient significantly.

(Image Credit: Thinkstock)

Contribute to LifeHacker

Write for Us

Subscribe for latest stories